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Worldvisitguide > Northern Qi
Dynasties du Nord (II) : Northern Qibetween 550 and 577 (China)
Dynasties du Nord (II)
Eastern Wei Dynasty
Dynastie Wei de l'Ouest
Northern Qi
Northern Zhou Dynasty

The Northern Qi Dynasty (simplified Chinese : 北齐朝 - traditional Chinese : 北齊朝) was one of the Northern dynasties of Chinese history and ruled northern China from 550 to 577.

The Northern Qi Dynasty was the successor state of the Xianbei state of Eastern Wei, as Eastern Wei's paramount general Gao Huan was succeeded by his sons Gao Cheng and Gao Yang, who took the throne from Emperor Xiaojing of Eastern Wei in 550 and established Northern Qi as its Emperor Wenxuan.

Although Northern Qi was plagued by violent and/or incompetent emperors (Emperor Wenxuan, Emperor Wucheng, and Gao Wei), corrupt officials, and deteriorating armies for most of its existence, it was the strongest state of the three main Chinese states (along with Northern Zhou and Chen Dynasty) when it was established. Like most imperial dynasties, it gradually declined and was destroyed by Northern Zhou in 577. Emperor Wenxuan's son Gao Shaoyi, the Prince of Fanyang, under protection by Tujue, later declared himself the emperor of Northern Qi in exile, but was turned over by Tujue to Northern Zhou in 580 and exiled to modern Sichuan. It is a matter of controversy whether Gao Shaoyi should properly be considered a Northern Qi emperor, but in any case the year 577 is generally considered by historians as the ending date for Northern Qi.

Emperors
1. Wenxuandi (Gao Yang) (551-559)
2. Gao Yin (559-560)
3. Xiaozhaodi (Gao Yan) (560-561)
4. Wuchengdi (Gao Zhan) (561-565)
5. Houzhu (Gao Wei) (565-576)
6. Youzhu (Gao Heng) (576-577)

Northern Qi arts
Northern Qi ceramics mark a revival of Chinese ceramic art, following the disastrous invasions and the social chaos of the 4th century. Northern Qi tombs have revealed some beautiful artifacts, such as porcellaneous ware with splashed green designs, previously thought to have been developed under the Tang dynasty. Such a jar has been found in a Northern Qi tomb, which was closed in 576 CE, and is considered as a precussor of the Tang Sancai style of ceramics.

Also, brown glazed wares designed with Sasanian-style figures have been found in these tombs. These works suggest a strong cosmopolitanism and intense exchanges with Western Asia, which are also visible in metalworks and relief sculptures across China during this period. Cosmopolitanism was therefore already current during the Northern Qi period in the 6th century, even before the advent of the notoriously cosmopolitan Tang dynasty, and was often associated with Buddhism.

From Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northern_Qi
Text is available under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Text_of_the_GNU_Free_Documentation_License
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Oeuvres(6)

Asian Art Museum of San Francisco
Bodhisattva
Statue
Northern Qi
Anonymous
approx. from 550 to 577
Pratyeka Buddha
Statue
Northern Qi
Anonymous
approx. from 550 to 577
Seated bodhisattva Maitreya with attendants
Bas-relief
Northern Qi
Anonymous
551
Standing bodhisattva
Bas-relief
Northern Qi
Anonymous
approx. from 550 to 577
The Bodhisattva Avalokiteshvara (Chinese: Guanyin)
Statue
Northern Qi
Anonymous
571
The Bodhisattva Avalokiteshvara (Chinese: Guanyin) flanked by attendants
Group
Northern Qi
Anonymous
570